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Maries County History

A beautiful view over the Gasconade Valley
Beautiful Gasconade Valley in Missouri
I went fishing and camping here

Maries County Origins

MARIES COUNTY, MISSOUR HISTORY


Material taken from Maries County Chapter of


Goodspeed History of Various Missouri Counties


Published - 1889



Philip Hibler Ammerman, justice of the peace of Jefferson Town-ship, Maries Co., Mo., was born in Warren County, Mo., in 1821, and is a son of Isaac and Jane (Johnson) Ammerman, natives of Kentucky, where they were married, and from whence they removed about 1818 to what is now Warren County, Mo., where the mother-died about 1830 and the father a few years later. Philip H. was the eighth in a family of ten children, and obtained his early education at the common schools. When about eighteen years of age he located with his brother in what is now Maries County, Mo., where he has ever since made his home. In 1843 he married Sarah Ann, daughter of John and Elizabeth Carroll, formerly of Tennessee, but early settlers of St. Louis County, Mo., where Mrs. Ammerman was born. Mr. and Mrs. Carroll afterward removed to Maries County, where-they died. Mrs. Ammerman died July 18, 1887, leaving eight children, six of whom are living, viz.: John, Eliza Jane, James S., Joseph, Conrad and Willard B. Mr. Ammerman’s farm contains 556 acres, 200 acres of which are under cultivation, as a result of his industry and thrift. He has served as justice of the peace for nearly thirty years, having previously held the office of constable. He is a Democrat in politics, and for twenty-five years has been a member of the A. F. & A. M., now belonging to Lane’s Prairie-Lodge. Mr. Ammerman is one of the best known and most enter­prising farmers of Jefferson Township, and with the exception of a short time during the war, has devoted his entire attention to the pursuit of agriculture. Philip Ammerman, his paternal grandfather, was a native of Germany, who died in Kentucky. Robert Johnson, his maternal grandfather, was born in Ireland, and died in Warren County, Mo., about 1828, having served in the Revolution.



Hon. Warren Montgomery Barr, a prominent attorney at law of Vienna, Maries County, was born in Knox County, Mo., in 1851, and is a son of James and Jemimah (McLain) Barr. James Barr, who was of Scotch descent, was born in Kentucky in 1820, and moved to-Knox County, Mo., with his parents in 1830. He married in 1850, and in 1857 moved to Webster County, Mo., where he lived until 1860, and subsequently located in Pulaski County, Mo., where he died in 1869. His wife was born in Maryland in 1832, and is a daughter of John McLain, who was a soldier in the War of 1812. Mrs. Barr is yet living, and resides in Pulaski County. Of the eight children born to James and Jemimah Barr six are living, viz.: Warren M., Arthur, an attorney and printer of Marshall, Ark.; Minnie, wife of T. J. Combs; Albert, a physician of Huntsville, Ark.; Catherine, wife of Newton Vickars, and Clifford, living with his mother. Warren M. Barr received the principal part of his education at Richland, Pulaski County, and at the age of nineteen engaged in teaching, which profession he followed several terms. In 1874 he became a disciple of Blackstone, studying under J. B. Rackliff, of Waynesville, where he was admitted to the bar in 1876 under Judge V. B. Hill. He then formed a partnership with his former preceptor, J. B. Rackliff, with whom he remained until 1883. The following year he located in Vienna, Maries County, where he has ever since been actively engaged in the practice of his chosen profession. Mr. Barr was elected school commissioner of Pulaski County in 1879, to which office he was re-elected in 1881, serving four years. In 1886 he was elected prosecuting attorney of Maries County, in which position he ably served two years. In April, 1886, Mr. Barr, in partnership with his brother Arthur, bought the Maries County Courier, which under their super-vision became the Maries County Gazette. They published this paper until November 1888, when they sold it to D. Rainey, the present editor. In July 1876, Mr. Barr married Mary F. Bachelor, who was born in Franklin County, Mo., in 1852, and is a daughter of Nimrod Bachelor, of Pulaski County. Five children have blessed this union, viz.: Ida, Sidney, Nettie, Erne and Jessie. Mr. Ban- is a Mason.


Hon. William Hearst Bowles, M. D., a practicing physician and surgeon of Jefferson Township, Maries Co., Mo., since 1851, was born in St. Louis County, Mo., in 1827, and is a son of Judge Caleb and Mary (Hearst) Bowles, natives, respectively, of Virginia and South Carolina. Caleb Bowles was a well-to-do and successful farmer, of English descent, and was first married in Kentucky, before his removal to Missouri, where he located in St. Louis County, and subsequently married the mother of our subject; he was serving as judge of the St. Louis County Court at the time of his death, which occurred at the old Green Tree Tavern, then the best hotel in St. Louis, in 1836. He has two children by his first wife living in St. Louis, one of them nearly eighty years old. The paternal grandfather of our subject was Anderson Bowles, a native of Virginia. Mrs. Mary Bowles died about two years after her husband; she was a daughter of William G. Hearst, of Scotch descent, who removed from South Carolina to Missouri in 1808. William H. Bowles obtained his education at the common schools and at Desper's College, St. Louis County, Mo., and then began the study of medicine under Dr. Charles Halliday, in St. Louis. County, graduating from what was then known as McDoweIl's Medical College, St. Louis, in 1851. The same year he began the practice of his chosen profession in Lane's Prairie, then in Osage (since changed to Maries) County, where he has ever since been actively engaged, and has built up a large and lucrative practice, proving him-self one of the most successful and efficient physicians of Southeastern Missouri. His practice extends over Maries. Osage, Cole, Miller, Phelps, Crawford and Gasconade Counties, and what was formerly his exclusive territory now supports not less than thirty physicians. He is probably the oldest practitioner of Maries County, and is one of its wealthiest citizens, owning over 5,000 acres of land, situated in different counties, as well as mining interests in California. He has a magnificent home at Lane's Prairie, and devotes considerable attention and takes great interest in stock-raising. In 1868 Dr. Bowles represented Maries County in the State Legislature, discharging his duties with much credit. He is a man of more than ordinary ability and endurance, and though well along in years is still active and enterprising. He is a Democrat in politics, and for over thirty years has been a member of the A. F. & A. M., now a charter member of St. James' Lodge. He was first married in 1852 to Augusta Glanville, of St. Louis County, a daughter of an itinerant Methodist minister, who died in St. Louis County. Mrs. Augusta Sophia Bowles died in 1857, leaving two children. In 1866 Mr. Bowles married Mrs. Louisa Greatwood Kinsey, widow of Thomas J. Kinsey, who was a wealthy merchant of Knobview, Crawford Co., Mo., and died in 1865. Mrs. Kinsey was born in England, and was a daughter of William Bray; she died in 1868, the mother of one child, a daughter, by her first marriage. Miss Minnie, now living, and two children by her last husband, neither of whom is now living. Dr. Bowles next married in 1887 Elizabeth Ella, daughter of Judge Matthew William and Margaret Ann Kinsey, the former born in New Jersey in 1821, and the latter a native of Gasconade County, Mo. Mr. Kinsey removed with his parents to St. Louis County, Mo., in 1834, and after his marriage located in Maries County, where he served six years as county judge, and he and wife still live; his father was Thomas Kinsey, a native of Wales, who came to the United States in 1821, and died in Maries County, Mo., in 1860. Mrs. Elizabeth Bowles is a native of Maries County, and is the mother of five children, four of whom survive.


Edward Bates Bowles, a practicing physician of Vienna, Maries County, was born in Jefferson County, Mo., in 1842, and is a son of Andersen and Elizabeth (Van Dover) Bowles. Anderson Bowles was born in St. Louis County, Mo., in 1812. His father was Caleb Bowles, who was a native of Hanover County, Va., and removed to the State of Missouri in 1811, locating near St. Louis, and at the time of his death was serving as judge of the county court of St. Louis County. After his marriage Anderson Bowles resided in Jefferson County, Mo., until 1854, representing that county in the State Legislature four times. He is now living in St. Louis County on his father-in-law'sold homestead. Mrs. Elizabeth Bowles was a daughter of John Van Dover. She died in 1883, at the age of sixty-eight years. Eight children were born to Anderson and Elizabeth Bowles, five of whom are now living, viz.: Mary E., wife of John B. Lewis, of St. Louis County; Emma, who married Rufus A. Lewis, also of St. Louis County; Samuel A., a physician of Westphalia, Osage Co., Mo., and Joseph W., a farmer of St. Louis County, and Edward B. The latter was reared and grew to manhood on the farm, making his home with his parents until twenty-one years of age, when he commenced the study of medicine under his uncle, W. H. Bowles, at Lane's Prairie, Maries County. After studying about three years, in 1864 he en­tered the St. Louis Medical College and took a full course, graduating in the spring of 3866. He began the practice of his chosen profession on Jake's Prairie, Crawford Co., Mo., where he was actively engaged about five years, at the expiration of that time removing to West­phalia. He located in Vienna in 1875, and has ever since devoted his entire attention to healing the sick in Maries County. In March 1867, Dr. Bowles married Mollie E. Patton, a native of Franklin County, Mo., and a daughter of Dr. Nelson Patton. Three children blessed this union, viz.: William M., Anderson P. and Addison V. January 2, 1870, Mrs. Bowles was accidentally killed by the falling of a tree as she was riding home from church one night on horseback. In June 1876, Dr. Bowles married Emma Sterriger, who was born in Franklin County, Mo., and died in the fall of 1877. The Doctor next married, in 1881, Martha L. Hyer, of Dent County, Mo., and a daughter of Dr. John Hyer. They have two children, John Hyer and James Joseph. Dr. Bowles is a stanch Democrat politically, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He is one of the most prom­inent physicians of Maries County, and is a man highly esteemed for his integrity. His wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church.



Benjamin F. Branson, assessor of Maries County, and a prominent farmer of Dry Creek Township, was born on the farm upon which he now lives in 1859. His parents were Jared and Sally (Bumpass) Branson, born respectively in Marion County, Term, and Gasconade County, Mo. Jared Branson was born in 1817, and in 1829 with his father, grandfather and five brothers located in Gasconade County, Mo., where the father and grandfather, who were both named John Branson, died within two weeks of each other, in 1830; both were natives of Virginia, and the former served as a soldier in the War of 1812. The great-great-grandfather of our subject, who was also named John Branson, was a native of England, and immigrated to America before the Revolution on the same vessel as she who afterward became his wife, both being apprenticed to pay their pas-sage. They settled in Virginia, where they spent the remainder of their lives, and were familiar friends of Washington. Jared Branson was reared in Gasconade County, where he married in 1840, and lived until 1857, when he settled in Maries County and improved a good farm; he was an extensive stock-dealer, and was a prominent and esteemed citizen of the county, and in 1866 was elected judge at large of Maries County Court, but owing to non-reconstruction was not commissioned. He died in 1882 a member of the Methodist Church, of the A. F. & A. M., Rolla Lodge, and in politics a Democrat. The mother of our subject was born in 1825, and is still living; she is a daughter of William and Sally Bumpass, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Tennessee, who settled on a small improved farm in Gasconade County about 1822; the mother died in 1825, and the father in 1867. William Bumpass served as justice of the peace, public administrator and county school commissioner of Gasconade County, and was a surveyor, first coming to Missouri when a young-man with a corps of surveyors and assisting in the government survey; he was among the first white settlers of Gasconade County, and was twice married, rearing nine children. Benjamin F. Branson attended the common schools until seventeen years of age, and then engaged in trading, which he followed some years. In 1879-80 he attended the State University, but was called from his studies on account of his fathers ill health, and he at once took charge of the farm. In 1883 he married Parrie, daughter of James B. and Sally Duncan. Mrs. Branson was born in Maries County. They have three children. Mr. Branson lives on the old home farm, which contains 840 acres of good valley land, and is one of the best farms in the county; about 200 acres are under cultivation. Mr. Branson was elected justice of the peace in 1886, and in 1888 was made assessor of Maries County. He served six years as road overseer, and since 1883 has been postmaster of Weldon Postoffice. He is a Democrat politically, is a member of' the A. F. & A. M., Vienna Lodge, Dixon Royal Arch Chapter, Leba­non Commandery, and of Dixon Lodge, of the L. O. O. P. Mrs. Branson is a member of the Baptist Church.


William P. Games owns and cultivates a fine farm of 455 acres three miles east of Vienna, in Jackson Township, Maries County. He was born in McMinn County, Term., in 1830, and is a son of Jahu and Nancy (Burton) Games, natives of Virginia, who were early settlers of McMinn County, Tenn., where they lived until 1838, when they removed to what is now Osage County, Mo. The father died in Maries County, Mo., in 1868, and the mother in the same county in 1876. Jahu Games was an able Methodist minister for many years, and was one of the pioneer preachers of the southern part of Missouri, where he became well known and respected, and assisted in organizing many churches; he was a generous, cheerful giver, and at his death the church and community lost a most enterprising citizen. Josiah Carnes, grandfather of William P., was also a native of Virginia, and died in that State. William P. Carnes was but a boy when his parents located in Missouri, which was then a wild country, sparsely settled, except by wild animals, who made night hideous with the barking of wolves and screeching of panther, and the life of the pioneers was filled with many hardships. He received but a limited common-school education, and upon reaching his maturity turned his attention to farming. In 1856 he married Ruth Ann, daughter of David and Sarah Branson, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Tennessee, who were early settlers of Gasconade County, Mo., where they married and afterward settled in what is now Osage County. Mrs. Branson died in 1845, and Mr. Branson again married, and died in Phelps County in 1871. Mrs. Games was one of a family of six children, and was born in Osage County. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Games, viz.: Elizabeth, wife of Robert Kinnaird; Mary, who married W. D. Adkin, of Laclede County, and Nancy, who married W. T. Agee, and died January 1, 1887. Mr. Carnes lived in Osage County until 1869, when he removed to Maries County, and after living six years in Vichy located on his present farm, which lies on the Gasconade Bottom, and has over 200 acres under cultivation. He devotes considerable attention to stock-raising, and is one of the most enterprising farmers of Jackson Township. Politically Mr. Carnes is a Democrat. Both are consistent members of the Methodist Church.

Hon. William Marcus Copeland, judge of the First District of the County Court of Maries County, and a farmer and stock-raiser of Jack-son Township, was born in Pulaski County, Mo., in 1842, and is a son of John and Mary America (Wiseman) Copeland. John Copeland was born in Knox County, Tenn., April 26, 1819, and when twelve years of age removed to the State of Missouri with his parents, who located in Osage, now Maries County, five miles north of Vienna. John Copeland married in 1839, and located near the old homestead, from which place he removed to Pulaski County in 1841, where he lived about five years, and then returned to Maries County, settling three and a half miles north of the county seat, where he owned 320 acres of land. He died October 27, 1876. The mother of our subject was born in Knox County, Tenn., February 6, 1823, and is still living; she is the mother of eleven children, seven of whom survive, viz.: William M., Francis M., Calvin C., Albert W., John K, Telitha T., wife of Herbert Adkins, and Matilda, wife of David Helton. William Copeland, paternal grandfather of our subject, a native of Virginia, served as a soldier in the War of 1812, was one of the pioneers of Central Missouri, and died in 1862. William M. Copeland was reared to the pursuit of farming, and during the war served nine months in the State Militia in the company commanded by Capt. Beasley. August 19, 1860, he married Adaime Cowen, who was born in Maries County, Mo., in 1843, and is a daughter of David and Teli­tha (Martin) Cowen. To this union have been born fourteen children, viz.: Mary E., wife of David Taff; Telitha J., wife of T. J. Knobblet; Lumima E., wife of F. M. Terry; Julia, wife of George Terry; MyriaJeanzadia, wife of S. B. Twilliger; Calvin C., David A., Granville M., Ida E., John L., Minnie A., Lorenzo D., Lannie M. and William O. After his marriage Mr. Copeland located six miles north-west of Vienna; he has ever since resided in Maries County, and re-moved to his present farm, three-quarters of a mile southwest of Vienna, about 1885. He owns 160 acres of land, and is an enterprising farmer and respected citizen of the county. He served as justice of the peace in Boone Township, and in the fall of 1888 was elected on the Democratic ticket as judge of the First District of the County Court. Mr. and Mrs. Copeland are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.




B. F. Crismon, a farmer and stock-raiser of Boone Township, Maries County, Mo., residing ten miles west of Vienna, is a son of James and Frances (Eads) Crismon, both natives of Maries County, Mo., the former of whom was born about 1823, has been a farmer and stock-dealer in his native county all his life, and is still living. B. F. Crismon was the eighth in a family of twelve children, and was born in Maries County in 1861. He received his education in the common schools, and lived with his parents until he reached maturity. In 1879 he married Amanda Taff, who was born in Maries County in 1864, and is a daughter of John and Mahalia Taff, natives of Tennessee. Mr. and Mrs. Crismon have one child living. Mr. Crismon owns about 770 acres of land, 400 of which are a part of the old homestead, and is located on Little Maries Creek. A few months ago he discovered traces of gold on his farm, and sent some of the soil to Chicago, where it was discovered to contain gold to the value of $78 per ton. He is quite elated over the discovery, as well he may be, and intends mining the mineral as soon as possible. The paternal grandfather of Mr. Crismon was Christ Crismon, and his mother's father was Benjamin Eads, both of whom were pioneer settlers of Maries County. Mr. Crismon is a Democrat politically.

Robert Sevier Crum, a farmer and stock-raiser of Jackson Town­ship, Maries County, was born in Greene County, Tenn., September 5, 1828, and is a son of John and Jennie (Roberts) Crum. John Crum, who was a farmer and miner, was born in Tennessee about 1778, and when young moved with his father, who was a native of Germany, to Greene County, Tenn., where the father died in 1835. John Crum was married in Tennessee, and was accidentally killed while working in an iron mine in 1838. The mother of our subject was a native of North Carolina, and was of English descent; after the death of Mr. Crum she married Jeremiah Roberts. Mrs. Roberts died about 1870; she was the mother of fourteen children, twelve by her first husband, of whom Robert S. was the youngest but one. He was reared on the farm, and lived with his mother until nearly twenty-four years of age. August 12, 1852, he married Elizabeth Hutchison, who was born in Greene County, Tenn., in 1829, and was a daughter of Joseph and Rachel (Meyers) Hutchison, natives of Greene County, Tenn., who immigrated to Maries County, Mo., in 1853, and located in Johnson Township. To this union were born seven children, viz.: Rachel J., wife of James Malone; John F.; Mary E., wife of James Copeland; Joseph P., George W., Lanettie, and William J. In 1853 Mr. Crum left his native State and immigrated by wagon to Maries County, Mo., with a company of about fifty, the journey requiring some six weeks. In 1854 Mr. Crum located on the tract upon which he now resides, which is on the Cooper branch of the Gasconade River, better known as "Cowell Hollow;" he rented his farm until about 1870, when he-bought 114 acres, and has since added acre after acre and tract after tract until he has become the owner of 2,000 acres, and is one of the most extensive farmers in Maries County; he has 400 acres of land under cultivation, and his farm is well improved with fences and buildings, etc. He devotes considerable attention to stock-raising, in which he has been very successful, now owning 130 head of cattle and other stock. In February 1870, Mr. Crum lost his wife. In April 1871, he married Harriet Agnes Collins, nee O ' Neal, who was born in Eng-land in 1829. They have one child, Harriet Agnes. Mr. and Mrs. Crum are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.


J. Russell Duncan, a farmer and stock-raiser of Miller Township, Maries County, was born in Garrard County, Ky., in 1839, and is a son of Alvis and Ann (Palmer) Duncan, the former born in Washing-ton County, East Tenn., and the latter in Garrard County, Ky. The parents were married in Kentucky, where they lived until J. Russell was about five years of age, and then removed to Miller County, Mo. where they settled on a farm, upon which the father died in 1883; his wife is still living at the age of eighty years; both were members of the Baptist Church. J. Russell Duncan was the eldest of a family of six, and was reared in Miller County, his educational advantages being limited. In 1863-64 he served in two different companies in the Enrolled Missouri Militia. In 1864 he married Sarah E., daughter of William H. and Mary C. Scott, the former of whom was born in Kentucky in 1817, and was taken by his father to Indiana, where he was bound till grown; he then went to Missouri, married and settled in Laclede County, where he resided until about 1854, afterward locating in Maries County, where he still lives, and is a wealthy farmer; his first wife, who was a native of Missouri, died in 1885, and he married again. Mr. Scott and two sons served nearly three years in Company M, Third Missouri Cavalry, United States Army. Mrs. Duncan was born in Laclede County, Mo., and is the mother of twelve chil­dren, viz.: Parrie, wife of B. F. Branson; Elben, formerly a teacher, now a farmer; Milford, also a farmer; Alice, who married Thomas Branson; Lillie and Lawrence (twins), Lida, Ella, Ivan, Alvis, Dora (deceased) and Dellard (deceased). Since his marriage Mr. Duncan, has lived on his present farm, which contains 280 acres of the old home place. He owns in all 800 acres, 360 in Miller County and 160 in Pulaski County, besides his farm in Miller Township, Maries County, and 120 acres left him by his father. He is one of the most promi­nent and enterprising farmers of the county, and has been unusually successful in the pursuit of agriculture; he also devotes considerable-attention to stock-raising. He is a Mason, and belongs to the Agricult­ural Wheel. Mrs. Duncan is a member of the Baptist Church.



Lewis Eads, a farmer of Dry Creek Township, Maries County, is a native of Osage County, Mo., and was born m 1827. He is a son of Benjamin and Polly (Hugh) Eads, who were early settlers of Osage County, Mo., where they lived until our subject was a young man, and then removed to what is now Maries County, settling on Big Maries Creek. Benjamin Eads improved a good farm in Maries County, where he died in 1880 at the age of seventy-four years. The mother of our subject died soon after their location in Maries County. Lewis Eads had few educational advantages, and has devoted his life to the-pursuit of agriculture, removing to Maries County with his parents. About 1850 he married Jane, daughter of William and Serena E. Simpson, early settlers of Maries County, where the father died. Mrs. Eads was a native of Missouri. She died April 24, 1882, while re-turning home from Texas, whither she had gone to improve her health; she was buried on the old farm near Vienna. Of the eleven children born to Mr. and Mrs.Eads, seven are now living, viz.: Serena E., wife of James Nelson; William S.; Mary Frances, who married Hiram Hughs; Moses N., Benjamin F., Lydia, now Mrs. Irvin Tackett, and Malinda, wife of John Briggs--all living in Maries County. Mr. Eads lived near Vienna until 1884, when he purchased his present farm in Dry Creek Township, which contains 160 acres, about 100 of which are under cultivation. During the late war he served a short time in the Missouri State Militia. He is a Democrat politically, and in religion is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which church his wife was also a member.




Thomas A. Felker, ex-county collector of Maries County, Mo., was born March 10, 1860, in Vienna, Mo., and is a son of John and Amanda M. (Anderson) Felker. John Felker died February 6, 1889. He was born in Hanover, Germany, March 8, 1830, and immigrated to this country in 1848, landing at New Orleans. After his arrival here he worked for a while at Cairo, 111., as a deck hand on a steam­boat. After this he went to Galena, 111., and worked as a day laborer in the mines at that place. For some time after that he was employed in a retail store in St. Louis. In 1850, when the California fever was in its full flush, he shipped for the Pacific coast, where he remained a few years, and, having accumulated some means, returned to the States in the spring of 1853, and in that year came to Osage County, and in connection with the late C. W. Holtschneider bought up a large herd of cattle for the California market. September 20, 1853, he was united in marriage to Amanda M. Anderson, eldest daughter of the late Thomas Anderson, of Maries County. She was a lady of considerable mental culture, having received her education at a semi-nary for young ladies in Mississippi. His venture in California with his cattle proved a financial failure. In the spring of 1855 he and his wife returned from California to the States by water, and were passengers on the ill-fated steamer "Yankee Blade," which was wrecked in the spring of 1855. Immediately after the location of the present site of Vienna, Mr. Felker erected the residence in which he died, and moved to the same in the fall of 1855, and early in the year of 1856 erected a small log house on the present location of the "Vienna Exchange," and went into business, continuing the same until the fall of 1858, when he sold out to James G. Holman, and immediately afterward went into the general merchandising business in partnership with R. W. Anderson, in the property now owned and occupied by Judge Robert Rowden; in 1860 he and Mr. Anderson sold out to Dr. V. G. Latham, and from that time on, until about the year 1878, he was actively engaged as a dealer in stock and farming. Mr. Felker filled the office of county treasurer twice by election and once by appointment, and was one of the few officers of the county who refused to take the oath prescribed by the constitutional convention of Missouri, known as the vacating ordinance. Mr. Felker never moved or changed his residence from the time he settled on his homestead, thirty-four years ago, to the time of his death. Mrs. Felker died March 20, 1878. Prior to the death of his wife, Mr. Felker had buried two children, an infant, who sleeps over the distant mountains, and a daughter, who, with father and mother, lie side by side in the village cemetery. He left surviving him three daughters and two sons, and since the death of his wife has resided with his children, to whom he was most devotedly attached. Being a man very positive in his convictions, filial affection was largely developed and a marked characteristic of his nature. His education was limited, but from observation and experience few were shrewder businessmen than he was. In adversity or in prosperity he was the same tireless worker. He always looked upon the bright side of whatever he was engaged in, and labored faithfully for success. His hospitality was extended to all alike, and friends, neighbors or acquaintances will often recall his many kindnesses indiscriminately bestowed. His son, Thomas A. Felker, received his early education at Vienna, and later spent eighteen months in the literary department of the Skate University at Columbia. Prior to his entering the university he had engaged in teaching in Maries County a short time. January 23, 1884, he married Millie Tyree, who was born September 1, 1862, and is a daughter of John Tyree, an attorney at law at Carthage, Mo. Three children have been born to this union, viz.: John Floyd, Lilian and an infant son. In 1881 Mr. Felker was appointed deputy collector of Maries County under J. M. Anderson, in which capacity he served four years, and in 1884 he was elected collector on the Democratic ticket, receiving a re-election in 1886. He has served the people faithfully, and with much credit. Mrs. Felker is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.








Peter Alphoncious Fenn, a young and enterprising merchant of Vienna, was born in New York City, January 27, 1856, and is a son 6f Anton and Mary Ann (Klug) Fenn. Anton Fenn was born in Germany, December 27, 1820, and when about fifteen years of age immigrated to America, locating in New York City, where he became a retail milk dealer, and afterward a wholesale dealer. He was engaged in the milk business about twenty years in that city, and in 1866 moved to Long Island, where he lived four years. In 1870 he located in Wayne County, Pa, where he purchased a fine farm of 135 acres, and devoted his attention to farming, but for the past three months has been living in Vienna, Maries Co., Mo. Mary Ann Fenn was born in Germany in 1820, and died in June, 1888, the mother of eleven children, only three of whom are living, viz.: Peter A., John, residing on the old homestead in Pennsylvania, and Mary, wife of Willis Hoyt, also living in Wayne County, Pa. Peter A. Fenn received his education in the public schools of Tremont, N. Y., and when but twelve years of age left school to work on the farm, which he continued until seventeen. He then commenced working as a house carpenter and millwright, and in 1877 went west, and erected a steam mill at Osage City, Mo., for Woolley & Locks. He afterward clerked for the same company in their store in that city one year, and the following year clerked on their steamboat, "Phil E. Chappell," on the Missouri River. He then took charge of a store for the same company at Proctor, which he resigned in 1881 to enter the employ of William Wettock, at Charleston, Mo. Two years later he was employed by R. L. Schenker, of Vienna, for whom he worked two years, and then accepted the position of deputy county clerk, which he filled eight months. The following two years he clerked for J. J. Lewis, at Dixon, Mo., and January 10, 1887, purchased from that gentleman a stock of goods at Vienna. Mr. Fenn had only $250, and the stock he purchased invoiced $1,285, but he gave his note for the balance. His familiarity with the mercantile business enabled him to manage his stock successfully, and that he has done so the biographer needs only to say that by April 1. 1888, Mr. Fenn had paid his note, was free from debt, and had a much larger stock than when he commenced. His trade is steadily increasing, and his store is known throughout the county as the "Wheel Store." He is a practical bookkeeper, energetic, and possesses much business ability.
Solomon Alphro Gremp, M. D., of Vienna, was horn in Maries Comity, Mo., October 5, 1859, and is a son of Louis Gremp von Freudenstein and Eliza (Copeland) Gremp. Louis Gremp was born in Germany July 22, 1832. His grandfather made a will leaving his estate as an endowment fund, the interest only of which was to be -used for the education of the male members of the family, each drawing money from six and a half years to twenty-six years. Louis Gremp took advantage of this will, as have also his sons. At the age of twenty-five Louis immigrated to the United States and became a citizen of Maries County, Mo. August 29, 1858, he married Eliza Cope-land, who was born in Tennessee August 30, 1832, and is a daugh­ter of Solomon and Melinda Copeland. Mr. Gremp lived in Maries. County until 1875, when he moved to Hickory County, resided there three years, thence went to Columbia, Boone County, and in 1886 returned to Maries County, where he now lives, four miles southwest of Vienna. He is the father of eight children, viz.: Dr. Solomon A., Charles M. (who was born May 27, 1861, and died December 23. 1881), Henry J. (born March 30, 1863, and is a physician at Dixon. Mo.). Fannie L (born July 29, 1865, wife of Joseph Eads). Christian C. (born June 1, 1867, a teacher by profession), William A. (born June-22, 1869, also a teacher), Melinda C. (born June 1, 1872), and Mary E. (born December 20, 1874). Dr. Solomon A Gremp received his literary education at Christian Institute, Waubleau, Hickory County, and in 1879 entered the medical department of the State University at Columbia, Mo., where he graduated June 2, 1882. January 1, 1883, he located near his old home at Vienna, and entered upon the practice-of his profession, where he has ever since been actively engaged. He is building up a large and lucrative practice, is well read in the profession, and is one of the most popular and enterprising physicians of Vienna. July 2, 1884, he married Missouri Annette Felker, daughter of John and Amanda (Anderson) Felker. Dr. and Mrs. Gremp have one child, Lena Eliza, born April 19, 1885. Politically the Doctor is a Democrat.


Prof. James B. Hayes, president of the Vichy Normal and Business Institute since its organization, in 1887, by himself and Prof. D. N. Gardner, is one of the most prominent and enterprising residents of Vichy. He was born in Greene County, Tenn., in 1850, and is the eldest of two sons and one daughter born to George W. and Maria (Hownen) Haves, also natives of Greene County, Tenn., where they lived until 1856, when they located in what is now Johnson Township, Maries Co., Mo. Since 1870 the parents have lived in St. James; the father is a carpenter, and during the late war served in Company G, Thirty-second Missouri Volunteer Infantry, United States Army, in which he enlisted in 1863, but after serving about one year was discharged on account of disability; he was a son of James Hayes. Benjamin Hownen, maternal grandfather of our subject, was of French descent, and was born in North Carolina; his death occurred in Greene County, Tenn. James B. Haves was reared on a farm, and in early life attended the common schools of his neighborhood. After spending one and a half years at St. James College, and one year at the North Missouri State Normal, at Kirksville, he turned his entire attention to teaching, and has been principally employed in the public schools of Maries, Phelps and Gasconade Counties. He is a close student and one of the best-informed and most prominent educators in Missouri. He was elected commissioner of the-schools of Maries County in 1880, to which position he was re-elected in 1882, serving with much credit during the four years. In 1887 Prof. Hayes married Ida E., daughter of Judge Mathew W. and Margaret Ann Kinsey. Mrs. Hayes is a native of Maries County.



Meshach Hodge is a farmer of Spring Creek Township, Maries County. He was born in Laurel County, Ky., in 1847, and when four or five years of age left his native State with his parents, Jeremiah and Frances (Freeman) Hodge, who stopped one season in Illinois, where the father died, and the family afterward located in what is now Maries County, Mo., where the mother died in 1881. Meshach Hodge was the third in a family of seven children, and obtained his education at the common schools. In 1871 he married Emeline, daughter of Ebenezer and Lucy Daniel, who were early settlers of Maries County, where as Mr. Daniel died in May 1878. His father was Thomas Daniel, a soldier in one of the early wars, who came from Tennessee to what is now Maries County at a very early day. Mrs. Lucy Daniel is still living, and is a daughter of Simon Feeler, who removed from Indiana to Maries, where he was an early settler. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hodge, viz.: Lewis A., born September 5, 1872; Leander R., born September 20, 1874; Ebenezer J., born February 26, 1877; John M., born March 6, 1879; George W., born August 16, 1881; Jeremiah, born February 6, 1884, and Iva A., born August 27, 1887. Mr. Hodge is one of the leading farmers of Spring Creek Town-ship, where he owns 370 acres of good farm land, which he devotes to stock-raising and the cultivation of grain. He is a Democrat in matters politic. A brother of our subject, John W. Hodge, near the close of the war enlisted and served about a year in the United States Army.

George Hughes, probate judge of Maries County, Mo., was born in Washington County, Mo., September 5, 1835, and is a son of William and Elizabeth (Keller) Hughes. William Hughes was 'born in Tennessee in 1802, and during the latter part of his life was a fanner by occupation, but formerly had learned and followed the trade of millwright. His father was John Hughes, who immigrated to Missouri when it was a part of the Louisiana district, and located in what is now Washington County. William Hughes was married in Montgomery County, Ky., in 1834, and immediately after settled in Washing-ton County, Mo., where he resided until about 1871. He then moved to Rockwall, Texas, where he died in 1875. His wife, who was a native of Montgomery County, Ky., died in 1870, at the age of fifty-six years. Of the twelve children born to William and Elizabeth Hughes, five are living, viz.: George; Louisa, wife of John McCrary, of Texas; James K., in Texas; Armilda, who married George Orr, and Lawson S., also in Texas. George Hughes was reared to the pursuit of farming, making his home with his parents until twenty-one-years of age. May 13, 1858, he married Miss Jane Wood, who was born in Washington County, Mo., in 1832, and died April 10, 1863, leaving three children, viz.: Thomas A., William N. and Armilda E., wife of A. J. Thompson. In August 1862, Mr. Hughes enlisted in Company D, Thirty-first Missouri Infantry, Union army, and did honorable service until his discharge at Cairo, Ill., July 14, 1865. In December 1862, he was wounded in the right thigh at the battle of Vicksburg, which disabled him from field duty until the following October, during which time he was on garrison duty. He now receives a pension of $6 per month. After the war he engaged in farming in Washington County until March 1873, when he removed to Maries County, locating in the northeastern part, where he owned 160 acres. In 1886 he was elected, by a large majority, on an independent ticket, as probate judge of Maries County, which office he still holds. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Masonic fraternity as well as the I. 0. 0. F. December 15, 1864, Mr. Hughes married Mrs. Matilda Yates, nee Stone, who was born in Canada in 1837, a daughter of James Stone. They are members of the Christian Church.


Monroe Johnson was born in Dry Creek Township, Maries County, in 1847, and is a son of Rev. Abraham and Emeline (A very) Johnson. He was the third born and is now the only living child of the family of four. In early life he attended the common schools, and afterward attended school at Steelville and St. James, later spending two years in the literary and scientific course at the State University. In 1871 he married Naomi O., daughter of Samuel C. and Naomi Fleming, of Phelps County, Mo., where Mr. Fleming has lived for nearly fifty years, having been a native of Tennessee. Mrs. Fleming was born in Alabama, and died in Missouri in November 1888. Of the six children born to Mr. and Mrs. Johnson one son and three daughters survive. Since his marriage Mr. Johnson has lived on his present farm on the Gasconade River, one mile from his birthplace; he owns in all about 290 acres, and is one of the leading and enterprising farmers and stock-raisers of the township. He takes an active interest in educational matters of the county and spares no pains to give his children a good education. In 1875 he was appointed postmaster of Clifty Dale postoffice, which appointment he held several years, and was again made an incumbent of the same office in 1881. He took the census of Dry Creek and Spring Creek Townships in 1880, and has done much for the up building of the surrounding country. He is a Democrat politically, and in religious belief he and wife are advocates of the Holiness faith. Rev. Abraham Johnson, father of our subject, was born in St. Louis County, Mo., in 1817, and two years later removed with his parents to what is now Maries County, Mo., where they were among the earliest white settlers. Here Abraham was reared among the Indians and wild beasts of the forest, enduring the hardships of pioneer life and deprived of all educational advantages. He was fond of hunting, and in early manhood spent several years engaged in flat-boating on the Gasconade and Missouri Rivers. He was an enterprising farmer, and as a result of industry and good management ac-cumulated considerable property, which he lost through going surety for friends; but not despairing, he has since again placed himself in comfortable circumstances. He was a close student, and in 1844 be-came a licensed minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and was a member of the St. Louis Presbytery, preaching in Arkansas and the southern part of Central Missouri. In 1855 he became a practicing attorney of Maries County, and was an able practitioner, holding the office of county attorney; he also served about forty years as justice of the peace, assessor, public administrator, and in 1862-63 represented Maries County in the State Legislature. Soon after the outbreak of the war he was made captain of Company A, Sixty-third Enrolled Missouri Militia, and in 1862 became major of Maries County Militia, which he successfully conducted. During the latter part of the war he served as a private in the regular United States service. Mr. Johnson has been married three times. He first married, in 1840, Emeline Avery, who died in 1851, and in 1853 he married Nancy McGee. His third marriage occurred in 1857, to D. E. Dunivin. Mr. Johnson has spent nearly his entire life in Maries County, and is probably the oldest settler now living there, having been a resident of the county seventy years, and one of its most prominent and respected citizens. He is a son of Thomas Johnson, who was born in Grainger County, Tenn., about 1782, and died in Maries County, Mo., in 1855. The latter came to St. Louis in 1815 with his father, who was also Thomas Johnson, and came from England with his brother Robert in an early day. Robert Johnson served in the Revolution, but Thomas had taken the oath of allegiance to his mother country. Thomas Johnson was in the War of 1812, and was with Jackson at the battle of Horseshoe Bend, Tenn., against the Indians.


Dr. N. B. Jones, a practitioner of Jefferson Township, Maries County, has built up a large and lucrative practice, and is one of the leading physicians of the county. After receiving a common-school education he studied medicine under an elder brother, Dr. T. J. Jones, for two years, and subsequently entered the Louisville Medical College of Kentucky, where he attended one course of lectures, when he returned to Missouri, fully intending to return to the college the following year, but was prevented. In 1875 he entered upon the practice of his chosen profession at his present location, and from the first has been very successful. His residence is eighteen miles northeast of Vienna, where he has just completed a fine dwelling and outbuildings to correspond, which are surrounded by a farm of 560 acres of land, 300 of which are tillable. Dr. Jones was born in what was then Gasconade County, Mo., September 8, 1848, and is the youngest of a family of eleven children, eight of whom are now living, born to Elijah and Elizabeth (Johnson) Jones. Elijah Jones was a native of Virginia, and was born about 1807, and about 1830 removed to Missouri, locating in that portion of Gasconade County, which was afterward organized as Maries County. He served as county judge of Gasconade County, and also in Maries County, holding that office over twenty years, and proving himself a most efficient officer; he also served as justice of the peace, and was an influential citizen; he died in Maries County in 1881. The mother of our subject was born in Kentucky in 1812, and died in Maries County, Mo., in 1863. November 10, 1878, Dr. N. B. Jones married Augusta E. Arendell, who was born in Maries County in 1857, and is a daughter of Joseph and Elvina Arendell, natives respectively of Kentucky and Virginia, the former of whom, born in 1812, died in Miller County, Mo., in 1883; his widow, who was born in 1821, is still living in Miller County. Two children have been born to Dr. and Mrs. Jones, one of whom is living, viz.: Oilie Estella. Dr. Jones' sympathies are with the Democratic Party, but he takes no active interest in politics.


Rev. Henry Anthony Bernard Kuennen, priest of the Visitation of Blessed Virgin Mary's Catholic Church, Vienna, Mo., was born in St. Louis County, Mo., in 1855. His parents were Theodore Henry and Elizabeth (Luebbers) Kuennen, natives of Germany, both born in 1818. They immigrated to the United States in 1852, locating in St. Louis, Mo., where the father, who was a mechanic, died in 1879; his wife is yet living. Rev. Henry A. B. Kuennen received his education at the Christian Brothers' School in St. Louis, and at the College of Teutopolis. Illinois, which he entered in 1870, remaining two years; he subsequently spent two years in Milwaukee, Wis., and in 1876 sailed for Rome, Italy, where he was a close student for six years, preparing for priesthood. He returned to his native country in 1882, and was sent as assistant priest to Edina, Knox Co., Mo. July 16. 1885, he was sent to Vienna, where he has since been priest in charge. He also holds service every second Sunday in each month at Viessmann, Maries County, and ten miles from the county seat. Mr. Kuennen is a man of acknowledged education and culture and of deserved prominence and esteem in the church of his faith.


J. F. Lindner, a blacksmith and farmer of Grove Dale, Jefferson Township, Maries Co., is a native of Franklin County, Mo., and was born August 18, 1847. He is the fifth born of the family of seven children, of whom George Albert and Mary Kunigunda Klein Lindner were the parents. George Albert Lindner was born in Wurtsburg, Bavaria, October 31, 1803, and immigrated to Franklin County, Mo., about 1842, where he engaged in farming, and still lives at an advanced age; his wife, who was also a native of Bavaria, was born May 11, 1814, said died in Franklin County, November 13, 1875. When seventeen years of age J. F. Lindner entered a carpenter shop at Union, Franklin Co., Mo., where he served an apprenticeship, and subsequently went to St. Louis, where he worked as a molder one year; he afterward learned the blacksmith's trade, which he followed nine months at Dorchester, Macoupin Co., Ill., and two years and four months at Carlinville, same county. In 1869 he removed to Lane's Prairie, Maries Co., Mo., and in partnership with his brother engaged in blacksmithing for three years, at the expiration of which time our subject opened a shop of his own at Grove Dale, where he has ever since been doing a good business at his trade. He owns 130 acres of land, a small portion of which is under cultivation. Mr. Lindner is a Republican in politics, and in 1886 was elected justice of the peace of Jefferson Township, of which office he is the present incumbent. June 4, 1872, Mr. Lindner married Elizabeth M. Gehlert, who was born in Franklin County, Mo., in May 1849, and is a daughter of Godfrey and Margaret Gehlert, the former of whom died in Franklin County, Mo., in 1862, and the latter in the same county in 1865. Mr. and Mrs. Lindner are the parents of four children, three of them living, viz.: William F., Cora E. and Edward A. Mr. Lindner is a member of the Masonic lodge of Lane's Prairie, and is a prominent citizen of Jefferson Township.


John E. Love, a prominent farmer and stock-dealer of Johnson Township, Maries Co., Mo., is the only son in the family of seven children born to John and Polly (Wassan) Love, natives of Kentucky and Tennessee respectively. The parents were married in Tennessee about the year 1834 or 1835, and immediately immigrated to what is now Maries County, where they were among the earliest white settlers; they lived a few years on Spring Creek, and then removed to the southwest edge of Lane's Prairie, entering land from the Government, where they improved a good farm and spent the rest of their lives. The father was a well-to-do farmer and stock-dealer, and died at the age of thirty-five years, when our subject was but nine years of age; the mother died in August 1887. The paternal grandfather of John E. was Isaac Love, who came to Missouri with his son, where he spent the remainder of his life, a merchant on Spring Creek; he married a Miss Connelly, a daughter of a wealthy Tennessee slave-holder. John E. Love walked three miles to the ordinary subscription school of the early day, and when eighteen years of age he was employed hauling iron from the Meramec Iron Works to Springfield with an ox team. January 17, 1869, he married Cynthia, daughter of Augustus and Millie Pinnell, the former of whom was born and has thus far spent his life in Maries County; his father was Asa Pinnell, a Virginian, and the first settler of Maries County, where he was a blacksmith and farmer. Mrs. Lovers mother was born in Kentucky, and is still living, as is also her grandmother, the latter aged eighty-nine. Since his marriage Mr. Love has lived on his present farm with the exception of three years in Vichy. He owns in all 432 acres of land, and is an extensive farmer and stock-dealer. In 1879 he erected a business house in Vichy, and opened the first dry goods store in the town in partnership with Mr. Fritts, who retired after one year, and Mr. Love successfully continued the business alone until 1886. He also owns the old homestead where he was born and reared. Mr. and Mrs. Love are the parents of six children, four sons and two daughters. The parents are consistent members of the Christian Church. Mr Love is a Democrat politically.


Linden Marts became a resident of Maries County, Mo., in April 1869, and purchased the place upon which he now resides in July 1881. He is a farmer and stock-raiser by occupation, and his farm, 'which is located in Jefferson Township, contains 248 acres, about one-half of which is under cultivation. Mr. Marts was born in Wood County, Ohio, February 2, 1844, and is a son of Solomon and Elizabeth (St. Clair) Marts, the former of whom was a native of Metz, Prussia, and was born about 1821. When a boy Solomon Marts left the country of his birth and immigrated to the United States, first locating in Pennsylvania, where he learned the wheelwright's trade, in which he became a master workman and followed many years in the State of Ohio, where he accidentally met his death while curbing a well, in 1860. Mrs. Elizabeth Marts was born in Wood County, Ohio, about 1826, and was a granddaughter of Gen. St. Glair, a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and a general in the War of 1812. Linden Marts was the eldest of seven children, and remained at home until the beginning of the war. August 11, 1861, he enlisted for three-years in Company C, First Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, serving out the full term. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Perryville, and was taken prisoner at the battle of Stone River on the 31st of December, 1862; he was confined in Libby Prison three months, and the following April exchanged, when he again entered active service. He received two severe bullet wounds at the battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19, 1863. January 23, 1865, he married Helena Henry, who was born in Massachusetts about 1845, and died July 3, J871, leaving two children, viz.: Clara May, now the wife of Thomas Stockton and Velmer A., who married Lafayette Bird. August 31, 1873, Mr. Marts married Eliza B. Druey, who was born in Green County, Ky., November 12, 1855, and is & daughter of Hi ram and Elizabeth Druey, both natives of Kentucky, where the father died in 1856; the mother died in Osage County, Mo., October 26, 1874. Mr. and Mrs. Marts are the parents of seven children, viz.: Uba Silas, Abijah P., Addison W. (deceased), Vandalia H., Zobeide A., Vivan H. and Florismie B. In 1872 Mr. Marts was elected justice of the peace of Miller Township, Maries County, but resigned and removed to Vienna before the expiration of the term. He was elected to the same office in Vienna, which he resigned to accept the office of constable, to which he was twice re-elected. He is the present Worshipful Master of the Masonic lodge at Lane's Prairie. Mrs. Marks is a member of the Presbyterian Church.


La Fayette Murry is a farmer of Johnson Township, Maries Co., Mo., and was born in Monroe County, Tenn., in 1834. His parents were Thomas and Nancy (Noblett) Murry; the former, who was of Irish parentage, was a shoemaker by trade, and followed flatboating to New Orleans. In 1839 he made a trip to New Orleans, and was to meet his family (who were to come to Missouri with Mrs. Murray’s father, Will­iam Noblett) at St. Louis. The family afterward concluded to cross the river at Cape Girardeau, and came to what is now Maries County. Not finding his family at St. Louis, Mr. Murry wrote back to his friends in Tennessee to learn their whereabouts, but before he received sufficient information, as was learned some years after, he is supposed to have met his death on the American Bottoms, in Illinois. The mother died about 1843. La Fayette and one sister were the only children, of whom the former was the elder. He received a limited common-school education, and, upon the death of his mother, was bound to Andrew Moreland, an uncle, with whom he lived until twenty-one. He was then employed in hauling iron from the Meramec Iron Works for several years. In 1858 he married Pennelia, daughter of William and Nancy Harrison, early settlers of Maries County, Mo., where they still live. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Murry, three of whom are living. Since his marriage, Mr. Murry has resided in Johnson Township with the exception of one year spent in Jefferson Township. He owns 120 acres of land, nearly all of which is under cultivation, and for the past fifteen years he has also been engaged in the saw-mill and thrashing business. During the late war he served over four months in Company I, Thirty-second Missouri Infantry, and was discharged in December 1862, on account of disability. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of St. James Post, G. A. R. Mrs. Murry has been a member of the-Baptist Church for many years; she is a native of Maries County.


John Otto, a merchant of Vienna, was born in Osage County, Mo., in 1856, and is a son of Anton and Kate (Hoghonhof) Otto, natives of Germany. Anton Otto was born in 1830, and when ten years of age immigrated with his father, Herman Otto, to the United States, locating in Westphalia, Osage Co., Mo. Anton Otto is a farmer by occupation, now living in Vienna, Maries Co., where he removed from near Westphalia, in 1870; in 1851 he married Kate Hoghonhof, who was born in 1827, and their union has been blessed with five children, viz.: Henry, John, Kate, wife of Conrad Avers; Ann, wife of Henry Wieberg, and Mary, who married Henry Schwartz. John Otto was reared to the occupation of farming, and remained with his parents until twenty-one, when he was employed at Vienna as salesman for R. L. Schenker, in which capacity he worked five years. In 1884 he established a general store of his own at Vienna, which he has since conducted, and is doing a profitable business, carrying a first-class, stock of general merchandise. February 22, 1881, he married Maggie Buschmann, who was born in Osage County, Mo., in 1858, and is a daughter of Joseph Buschmann. He was born in 1815, and died June 1, 1884. Mrs. Buschmann, his wife, was born December 31, 1819, and died January 24, 1879. Mr. and Mrs. Otto have three-children, viz.: Kate, William and Henry. The families are devout members of the Roman Catholic Church. Mr. Otto is a Democrat.




Dabney Rainey, editor of the Maries County Gazette, of Vienna, was born in Osage County, Mo., in 1862, and is a son of Dr. Leander and Isabella (Burch) Rainey. Dr. Leander Rainey was a native of North Carolina, and when a young man removed to Missouri, spending the remainder of his life in Linn. Osage County, where he died in 1874; he was a graduate of the medical profession, and for several years was the leading physician of Osage County. The mother of our subject was born in Cole County, Mo., in 1829, and is still living in Linn. Eight children were born to Dr. Leander and Isabella Rainey, viz.: August, Frank. Ida, Filmore, Shelton, Dabney, Cornelia (wife of John Weeks) and Belle. Dabney Rainey received his education at Linn, and when thirteen years of age commenced work in a printing office, to which business he has ever since devoted his attention. In November 1888, he bought the Maries County Gazette of Barr Bros., and is still editing the same, which has become one of the most prom­inent papers of the county under his successful management. July 8, 1888, he married Pauline C. Schenker, who was born in St. Louis, Mo., in 1866, and is a daughter of Robert L. Schenker. Mr. Rainey is a Democrat in politics.


Lewis N. Ramsey, a farmer and stock-raiser of Dry Creek Town-ship, Maries County, was born on the farm upon which he now lives in 1857, and is the youngest but one of the family of six children born to Robert L. and Mary J. (Avery) Ramsey. Robert L. Ramsey was born in Southeastern Missouri in 1809; he was a successful farmer of' Maries County many years, where he served as justice of the peace, and died in 1885. His father was De LaFayette Ramsey, a farmer and blacksmith, who was a pioneer of Missouri, was born in 1785, and died upon the farm in Maries County in 1868. Robert L. Ramsey was married three times, and settled on the farm our subject now owns in 1865. Mrs. Mary J. Ramsey was born in Alabama, and is still living in Maries County at the age of sixty-five years. Lowia N. Ramsey obtained but a limited education, and after reaching his maturity managed his fathers farm until 1882. In the latter year he married Cora B., daughter of Micajah and Mary Jane Williams. Two children have blessed this union. With the exception of two years Mr. Ramsey has spent his entire life in the pursuit of agriculture on his present farm, which contains 480 acres; he also owns other land to the amount of 800 acres, a part of which is good bottom land. He feeds and ships considerable stock, and is an enterprising farmer, highly respected by all who know him. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M., Vienna Lodge, and in politics he votes the Democratic ticket. Mrs. Ramsey is a member of the Baptist Church.





John F. Rowan, ex-county judge of Maries County, was born February 24, 1848, in St. Louis County, Mo. His parents died when he was small, and he was reared by his uncle, Andrew Rowan. In 1865 he began learning the carpenter's trade in St. Louis, at which he served an apprenticeship of four years, at the expiration of which time he went to Chariton County, Mo. June 19, 1870, he married Lucinda M. Haskell, who was born in the State of Maine, December 29, 1852. To this union six children were born, viz.: Lizzie, who was born in St. Louis, June 14, 1872; William A., born in Maries County, Jan-nary 28, 1873; Theron, born in March, 1876; Emma F., Nathan J. and Letitia. In December 1871, Mr. Rowan returned to St. Louis, and in September of the following year he became a resident of Maries County, locating in Boone Township, seven miles northwest of the county seat, on a farm of 320 acres. He engaged in farming until 1878, when he moved to Vienna, having devoted some attention to his trade of carpenter daring his last two years on the farm, find working on the Maries County court-house. In March 1878, he established a wagon-shop and also a blacksmith-shop at Vienna, first occupying his present shop in 1880, which he purchased the following year, and has since conducted successfully. He also owns a lumber yard, and is a skillful workman in wood, manufacturing coffins, etc., in connection with his other work. He has manufactured, in all, about thirty-five wagons since his establishment, which have given good satisfaction. He served as constable in Boone Township four years, mayor of Vienna three years, and justice of the peace from 1884 to 1888. In 1886 he was elected county judge of the first District of Maries County, serving two years, his term expiring in December 1888. Mr. Rowan is a member of the Masonic order, and is also a member of the United Presbyterian Church of St. Louis, of which faith his wife is also a follower. Judge Rowan is an enterprising citizen, and one who is active in all enterprises tending to promote the interests of the county, highly respected by all who know him, and charitable and generous to all deserving objects.


Robert Rowden (deceased), ex-county treasurer of Maries County,was born in Roane County, Tenn., in 1819, and was a son of Asa and Margaret H. (Hannah) Rowden. Asa Rowden was born in Henry County, Va., in 1792. His parents were Abram and Rachel (Cheek) Rowden, natives of Henry County, Va., who were born, respectively, in 1752 and 1762. About 1797 Abram Rowden immigrated to Roane County, Tenn., where he died in 1822. He was a tiller of the soil, teaching school in winter, and nothing is known of his ancestry, saves that the name and that of Lord Rowden, of Revolutionary fame, and is identical. Asa Rowden served as a substitute for his brother, Nathaniel, in the Indian war of 1812, serving as ranger near Edwardsville, Ill. In 1837 he removed from Roane County, Tenn., to DeKalb County, Ala., and in April, 1842, to Osage (now Maries) County, Mo. Asa died in 1865, and his wife, who was born in Blount County, Tenn., in 1797, died in 1873. At the age of seventeen Robert Rowden went with his parents to Alabama, where his uncle, H. B. Rowden, was engaged in selling goods to the Cherokee Indians. He entered the employment of his uncle, and when, two years later, the Cherokees were removed west, he went to work in a saw-mill at $11 per month, which he continued two years, at the expiration of which time he returned home, in ill-health, with only $75 and his saddle and horse; hence Horace Greeley did not mean him, when he said, "any young man who had not $100 of his own earnings by the time he was 21 would carry a poor man's head on his shoulders all the rest of his life." In 1842 Robert Rowden went to Missouri, where he worked a year or two at $11 per month, and finally erected a primitive mill on Tavern creek for grinding corn. He subsequently engaged in teaching, and September 17, 1846, married Nancy A. Tyree, who was born in Hardin County, Ky., in 1826. Of the nine children born to this union, six grew to maturity, viz.: Sarah E. (deceased), who married Stephen Hellton; Saterwhite, now a law student at the State University; Cordelia, wife of John W. Breeden; Louis C., who died in April, 1888, at the age of thirty-two, at the time of his death serving as circuit clerk and ex-officio recorder of Maries County; Robert Lincoln, a graduate of the law department of the Skate University at Columbia, Mo., and Nina Ann. Mrs. Rowden died December 19, 1888. Mr. Rowden engaged in milling for a time after his marriage, and his earnings finally enabled him to engage in merchandising with $50 worth of goods, first in a corner of the mill, later to the more commodious smoke-house, and finally in a log cabin, with puncheon doors and dirt floor. In the meanwhile he added a second-hand horse-mill to his property, all of which he and his wife attended to. By 1860 he had accumulated $6,000, and was about to purchase his cousin's mill and open a large business, when the war-cloud gathered, and before the contract was signed the owner was a refugee in Illinois. Not discouraged, Mr. Rowden "held the fort" until June, 1864, when he was deprived of all save his land, energy and good name, and was obliged to take refuge at Vienna, where he established him­self with a stock of goods worth $300, and was again raided and robbed. Still not discouraged, he purchased another stock of goods on credit, and continued selling until 1876, at which time he had become the local banker and postmaster of Vienna. He was elected county treasurer in 1874, to which position he was three times re-elected, serving in all eight years, with much credit and satisfaction to his constituents. He was justice of the peace twenty years, postmaster sixteen years, and judge of the county court six years, proving him-self a most able and efficient officer in all of these trusted positions. Judge Rowden became one of the most prominent citizens of Maries County, and doing a large loaning business, he wronged no man and oppressed none. He was most highly esteemed, and at his death, which occurred February 14, 1889, the county was deprived of an active, enterprising businessman, and one who took an active interest in all enterprises tending to promote the public good.


Robert L. Schenker, ex-county judge of Maries County, and a merchant and extensive stock-dealer of Vienna, was born in 1840 in Saxony, now the Kingdom of Prussia, Germany. He is a son of Gustavus and Bertha (Buechel) Schenker, also natives of Germany. Gustavus Schenker was a cooper by trade, and immigrated to the United States in 1846, locating in St. Louis. He died October 3, 1873, in Vienna, while on a visit to his son, Robert L. The mother of our subject is still living, and resides in St. Louis. They had three children, viz.: Alvin, a merchant in Omaha, Neb.; Robert L., and Sophia, who married Mr. Linder, of St. Louis. Robert L. Schenker was only six years old when his parents came to America. He received his education in the public schools of St. Louis, and at the age-of thirteen was employed as a clerk in a dry goods store, where he worked four years, and the following six years clerked at Kingston Mines, Ill. In 1863 he went to Memphis, Tenn., where he clerked four years and a half, after which he returned to St. Louis and was employed in the same capacity for Barr, Duncan & Co. until October, 1869, when they sent him to Vienna to take charge of a store for them. The company dissolved partnership in 1870, and in September of that year Mr. Schenker went into business for himself, purchasing a small stock of goods on credit for six weeks, and discounting his bills before the time expired. He then enlarged his stock, which has increased from time to time, until now he has a first-class, stock of general merchandise, and the largest in the county. His store­room is 56x20 feet, and his warehouse has a capacity of 3,000 bushels of wheat. He buys grain and stock, and also deals extensively in railroad ties. He owns 1,000 acres of land in Maries County, and is doing a large and lucrative business. In 1865 he married Caroline Dierker, who was born in St. Louis, February 24, 1842, and their children are Pauline, wife of D. Rainey, editor of the Vienna Gazette; Adelaide, wife of John D. Crosier, of Portland, Oregon; Robert H., Gertrude, Leonidus, Bertha and Mabel. In 1878 Mr. Schenker was elected judge of the First District of Maries County, in which position he served two years. In 1884 he was elected county treasurer of Maries County on the Democratic ticket, and was re-elected in 1884, serving his constituents with ability and credit. Mr. Schenker is one of the most substantial businessmen, financially, in Maries County, having accumulated his property through economy and close application to work at hand. He is universally esteemed by all who know him, and is active in all enterprises calculated to benefit and promote the interests of the community. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, which he entered at Kingston Mines, Ill., in 1861, and is also a Knight Templar of Lebanon Commandery. Mrs. Schenker is a member of the Roman Catholic Church.


William Smith, an enterprising farmer and merchant of Blooming-ton, was born in Gasconade County, Mo., in 1835, and is a son of Isaac and Catherine (Hall) Smith, natives of Tennessee and Virginia, respectively. The parents were married in Tennessee, and soon after removed to Gasconade County, Mo., where they were among the early settlers, and where Mrs. Smith died, about 1862. In 1867 the family removed to Maries County, and the father died at Lane's Prairie, July 3, 1881. The parents were consistent members of the Baptist Church for many years. William Smith was the third in the family of five sons and two daughters. He obtained but a limited education at the subscription schools held in log cabins in pioneer days, and began doing for him-self when about twenty-five years of age. After the close of the war he settled in Maries County, Mo., and immediately engaged in the mercantile business at Bloomington, under the firm name of Sorrell & Smith, which partnership was successfully continued ten or twelve years, when Mr. Sorrell retired, since which time Mr. Smith has con-ducted the business alone, which has proved a lucrative one. He is a thoroughly enterprising man, and is one of the largest land-owners in Maries County, his acres numbering seven or eight hundred. He has a fine home at Bloomington, on a farm of 120 acres, which he devotes to stock-raising, sparing no expense or pains on the quality of his stock. In October 1870, Mr. Smith married Mrs. Fannie Howard, nee Meade, who was born in Northern Missouri, and died in May 1884, leaving one son, James E. In 1887 Mr. Smith married Irene, daughter of John C. and Martha Ann Wallace, of Lanes Prairie, where Mrs. Smith was born. Mr. Wallace died in July 1886, and his widow still lives at Lane's Prairie. Mrs. Irene Smith died about eleven months after marriage. Mr. Smith is a member of A. F. & A. M., and a charter member of Lane's Prairie Lodge. In politics he is in sympathy with the Democratic Party.


Judge John H. Smith, county judge of the Second District of Maries County, was born in Franklin County, Mo., in 1836, and is a son of Dr. Joshua F. and Jane (Smith) Smith. The parents are natives of Charlotte County, Va. The father was born in 1804 and the mother in 1803. Dr. Joshua F. Smith was a son of William Smith, who was a soldier in the War of 1812. The former commenced the practice of medicine when young. He married in 1826, and in 1832 immigrated to Franklin County, Mo., locating eight miles east of Washington, where he was actively engaged in the practice of his chosen profession the remainder of his life. He was one of the pioneer physicians of Franklin County, and built up a large and lucrative practice. He served as justice of the peace a few years, being appointed by Gov. Dunkin, and at one time owned over 800 acres of land< He died in 1877. His wife died in 1854, the mother of five children, only two of whom are now living, viz.: Paulina F., widow of James A. Mealer, of Franklin County, and Hon. John H., subject of this sketch. The latter was reared to the pursuit of farming, and in 1854, attacked by the California fever, he, in company with five others, left home and friends and started for the "Golden Gate" to obtain a share of the hidden wealth. He worked in the gold mines until 1858, the following year taught school, and in 1859 returned to his home in Franklin County, Mo., via the Isthmus of Panama. At the out-break of the war his sympathies were with the South, and during Priced raid through Missouri, in 1864, he was captured and taken to Alton, Ill., where he was retained three months and pardoned by President Lincoln. Mr. Smith was a member of Shawls Battalion, and was connected with the commissary department. After the war he located near his old home and resumed farming. Judge Smith resided in, Franklin County until August 1884, when he purchased 240 acres of land in Dry Creek Township, Maries County, and removed thereto. In 1886 he was elected justice of the peace of his township, which office he still fills, and in November 1888, he was elected judge of the Second District of Maries County on the Democratic ticket. In December 1860, Judge Smith married Melissa A. Stoner, who was born in Franklin County, Mo., in 1837, and is a daughter of Isaac Stoner. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have long been consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The Judge is a prominent citizen of Maries County, and is highly esteemed by all who know him.





Lewis C. Smith, a farmer and stock-raiser of Johnson Township, Maries County, was born in Gasconade County, Mo., in 1857, and is a son of Isaac and Catherine (Hall) Smith, natives respectively of Virginia and Tennessee, who removed to Pike County, Mo., in an early day, and afterward to Gasconade County, settling on Hibler's Prairie. Mrs. Catherine Smith died in 1862, and in 1867 Mr. Smith removed to Maries County, where he lived until his death, which occurred July 3, 1881, at Lane's Prairie. The parents were both members of the Baptist Church for many years. Lewis C. Smith was the youngest of a family of five sons and two daughters, and received his education at the common schools. He came to Maries County with his father in 1867, and the following year married Georgie, daughter of John and Bebecca Smith, the former a native of St. Louis, where he was married and whence he subsequently removed to Gasconade County, Mo., going to California in an early day. Mrs. Rebecca Smith is still living in Gasconade County. Our subject and wife are the parents of five children. Since his marriage Lewis C. Smith has lived on his present farm at Lane's Prairie, which contains 280 acres, 170 acres of which are under cultivation. He is one of the well-to-do and enterprising farmers of Johnson Township, and his farm is one of the oldest and best improved on Lane's Prairie. Mr. Lewis Smith is a Democrat in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for Greeley in 1872.

Thomas L. Travis resides on a farm of 360 acres in Jefferson Township, Maries Co., Mo., fourteen miles northeast of Vienna, where he located in 1870. He was born in the State of Tennessee in 1844, and obtained a limited education at the common country schools of his native State. September 1, 1869, he married Susana Rogers, who was born in Gasconade County, Mo., in 1843, and is a daughter of Alexander S. and Delinia Rogers, the former of whom was born in Virginia in 1804, and died in Maries County, Mo., about 1876; he was an early settler of Osage County, Mo., where he served as county judge eight years. Mrs. Rogers was born in Tennessee in 1808 and died in Osage County, Mo., in 1854. Of the eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. Travis seven are living, viz.: Emma, Alfred (deceased), Samuel, Laura, Oliver, Mollie, Eva and Nora. The parents of Mr. Travis were W. H. and Catherine (Vance) Travis, whose sketch appears with that of John J. Travis, a brother of our subject. Thomas L. Travis has 125 acres of his farm under cultivation, and is one of the well-to-do and enterprising farmers of the township, an influential citizen, highly respected by all who know him. Mr. and Mrs. Travis are members of the Christian Church.

John J. Travis, a farmer, merchant and stock-dealer of Jefferson Township, Maries Co., Mo., is a native of Rutherford County, Tenn., and was born February 22, 1850. He is the youngest of five children, four of whom are living, born to W. H. and Catherine (Vance) Travis, both natives of Tennessee. W. H. Travis was born in 1813, and in 1854 removed from his native State to Maries County, Mo., where he engaged in farming, and was an influential and highly respected citizen until his death, which occurred in October, 1877; he served as justice of the peace of Jefferson Township for twenty years, and at the time of his death was serving his second term as county judge, to which office he was elected by the Democratic party. Mrs. Catherine Travis was born in 1820, and her death occurred in Maries County in June 1888. John J. Travis received his early education at the common schools, and first engaged in teaching school, subsequently being occupied in buying and shipping stock to St. Louis, and still devotes considerable attention to that line of business in which he has been successful. In August, 1873, he received the-appointment of postmaster of Steen's Prairie Postoffice, which position he still holds, and now has the office located in his store, which he opened in 1881; he carries a well-selected stock of general merchandise, valued at $1,500, and deals in all kinds of produce, enjoying a large and lucrative trade. Mr. Travis owns 600 acres of land, about 180 acres of which are under cultivation, and provided with good buildings and improvements. He is an unmarried man, and resides on the old homestead, with his sister, which is located on Dry Fork Creek, fifteen miles northeast of Vienna. A shrewd businessman, he is well and favorably known by his many friends and patrons.



George Durrett Underwood, circuit court clerk and ex-offlcio recorder of Maries County, was born in Taylor County, Ky., in 1847, and is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Druin) Underwood. Thomas Underwood was born in Green County, Ky., September 19, 1811; his father was a native of Virginia. Thomas Underwood was a farmer and merchant by trade, and a Missionary Baptist minister by profession; he preached the last thirty years of his life, living in Taylor County after 1843; he died in August 1887. His wife was a native of Virginia, and. was born the same date as her husband; she died March 15, 1888. They were the parents of thirteen children, twelve of whom lived to be grown, and ten of whom are now living, viz.: William T., in Hodginsviile, Ky., a minister of the Missionary Baptist Church; Catherine, wife of W. D. Ford, of Nelson County, Ky.; Andrew J., a miller and millwright of Hart County, Ky.; Clara, wife of Robert T. McFarland, of Taylor County, Ky.; Samuel, a farmer and miller of Taylor County, Ky.; Jane, who married Malcolm Thomas, of Larue County, Ky.; James D., in Hart County, Ky., a teacher by profession; Mollie, wife of Joshua Bennett, in Nelson County, Ky., and Sallie M., wife of William Adair, of Hart County, Ky. George D. was reared and grew to manhood on the farm. At the age of twenty-three he entered the teachers profession and taught eight terms. He located in Gasconade County, in 1868, where he engaged in fanning until 1871, and then moved to Maries County, locating on Lane's Prairie. Mr. Underwood devoted his attention to farming until 1882, when he was elected sheriff of Maries County, on the Democratic ticket, being re-elected in 1884. In the spring of 1888 he was appointed by Gov. Morehouse circuit court clerk, and ex-offlcio recorder, to fill the unexpired term of L. C. Rowden, who died in office, and at the fall election of the county Mr. Underwood was elected to fill the remaining two years of the term. He owns 250 acres of land, and is one of Maries County 'a best and most highly respected citizens. In 1869 he married Sarah Cummins, who was born in Camden County, Mo., in 1848, and is a daughter of Charles Cummins. Eight children have blessed this union, viz.: William J., Dora B., Charles T., Turner S., Louella, Grace T., Clara May and Frances E. Mr. Underwood is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in politics has been a life-long Democrat. He belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church, and his wife to the Christian Church.


M. Williams, more familiarly known as "Cage" Williams, a farmer and stock-raiser of Miller Township, Maries County, and post-master of Maries Postoffice, is a native of Franklin County, Mo., and was born in 1829. He is a son of John W. and Mary (Hinton) Williams, the former of whom is supposed to be the first white child born in St. Louis, Mo., his birth occurring September 17, 1795. He was reared in St. Louis County, and in 1823 was married in Franklin County, where he lived until 1855, when he removed to Cole County, and three years later settled in Maries County; he was a well-to-do farmer and stock-dealer, and served as a substitute in the War of 1812 on the frontiers of the West. He died in 1869. Joseph Williams, father of John W., was born in North Carolina, and was of Welsh parentage, his father coming to America from Wales in colonial days. Joseph served seven years in the Revolutionary War, and prior to 1795 emigrated West, living a short time at Whiteside Station, now East St. Louis; he then crossed the river and obtained a Spanish grant northwest of St. Louis, where he died in 1820, having predicted the exact date of his death; his widow, Sarah, died in Gasconade County in 1851, her birth having occurred in 1758; her knowledge of the Scriptures was remarkable, and questions in dispute were frequently brought for her decision. The mother of our subject was born in North Carolina in 1803, and in 1820 removed with her parents, John and Elizabeth Hinton, to Franklin County, Mo., where the father, who was a successful farmer, of English descent, died in 1837, and the mother in 1851. The educational advantages of M. Williams were limited, but attendance at the common schools, study by the fire-light, -and one term at Forest Hill Academy, near Jefferson City, enabled him to teach, which he followed until 1852, and then, with a company of about forty, of whom he was the youngest but was selected as cap­tain, he crossed the plains to California, a journey requiring 114: days. He spent two years successfully engaged in mining, and then returned home. He was married in Franklin County in 1854 to Mary J., daughter of Thomas and Emily (Burress) Crowe, the former born in St. Francois County, Mo., in 1807, and the latter born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1815. Mr. Crowe, who was a farmer and a practical engineer on the Mississippi River for many years, died with yellow fever in St. Louis in 1843; his wife died in Maries County, Mo., in 1865. Mrs. Williams was born in Cape Girardeau County, Mo., in 1833. Of the twelve children born to Mr. and Mrs. Williams seven are living, as follows: Laura E., wife of John Rigsby; Ashley G., present county surveyor of Maries County; Cora B., wife of L. N. Ramsey; Howard W., now in the gold mines in New Mexico; Effie B., teacher; Edna and May. Mr. Williams lived in Franklin County until 1855, when he removed to Cole County, and from there, in 1859, went to Maries County, locating on his present farm the following year. He now owns a fine farm of 320 acres, and is one of the most prominent and enterprising farmers and stock-raisers of the township. At the out-break of the late war the thought of his fathers and grandfathers service in the earlier wars inspired his patriotism, and in March, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Sixth Missouri Cavalry, operating in Southern Missouri, Arkansas and Mississippi. At Helena, Ark., July 12, 1862, he received severe sunstroke, and was in the hospitals at St. Louis, Helena and Benton Barracks until November 1862, when he was discharged for disability, and has never fully recovered from the effects of the stroke. Indeed as he grows older his disability increases, and he is almost deaf and blind. In 1868 Mr. Williams was elected surveyor of Maries County, which position he held six years. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the G. A. R. Mr. and Mrs. Williams have always been advocates of educational interests, and are well known and have a large circle of friends and acquaintances in Franklin, St. Louis, Gasconade, Osage and Cole Counties. They are faithful members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and are most highly respected citizens of Miller Township.